Saturday, May 26, 2012
hiyah-beijing:

instinctivepath:

Fascinating map of the distribution of language in the Iberian Peninsula.

O.O

hiyah-beijing:

instinctivepath:

Fascinating map of the distribution of language in the Iberian Peninsula.

O.O

Thursday, December 15, 2011
geocrusader80:

Language Map of Europe for Twitter users…According to this map, it looks as the users of Twitter tend to be located around major transportation infrastructures.
The colors represent languages: gray for English, purple for French, red for German…
“I really liked these maps both for their cartography but also for  their demonstration that  linguistic and national borders can be seen  online as well. There has  also been a tendency for fine scale mapping of  Twitter data so it is  nice to get a global perspective.”

geocrusader80:

Language Map of Europe for Twitter users…According to this map, it looks as the users of Twitter tend to be located around major transportation infrastructures.

The colors represent languages: gray for English, purple for French, red for German…

“I really liked these maps both for their cartography but also for their demonstration that linguistic and national borders can be seen online as well. There has also been a tendency for fine scale mapping of Twitter data so it is nice to get a global perspective.”

Saturday, December 10, 2011
geocrusader80:

Map of Ethnolinguanymics across the world.

Can someone help me? I’m probably going to sound stupid, but I don’t quite understand all of the examples: Israel and Hebrew are a match, but Saudi Arabia and Arabic aren’t? Likewise for Madagascar and Malagasy versus Ireland and Irish (although I think English might be the predominant language there, so that one might make sense).
I’d guess that it has to do with the name of the language in that language, but I’m pretty sure that “Ivrit” (the Hebrew name for Hebrew) is etymologically related to “Hebrew” rather than “Israel,” which sorta ruins that hypothesis.
Help?

geocrusader80:

Map of Ethnolinguanymics across the world.

Can someone help me? I’m probably going to sound stupid, but I don’t quite understand all of the examples: Israel and Hebrew are a match, but Saudi Arabia and Arabic aren’t? Likewise for Madagascar and Malagasy versus Ireland and Irish (although I think English might be the predominant language there, so that one might make sense).

I’d guess that it has to do with the name of the language in that language, but I’m pretty sure that “Ivrit” (the Hebrew name for Hebrew) is etymologically related to “Hebrew” rather than “Israel,” which sorta ruins that hypothesis.

Help?

Tuesday, November 8, 2011
ayearnersrealm:

The languages spoken in Africa in the ancient world. 

ayearnersrealm:

The languages spoken in Africa in the ancient world. 

Thursday, November 3, 2011

http://ninonkapi.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/generic-terms-for-soft-drinks.jpg

Have you posted this yet?

Honestly, I don’t remember if I have or not. I’ve definitely seen it before, though.

Submitted by scorpaeniform. Thanks!

Wednesday, October 19, 2011
paxamericana:

Ethnolinguistic Groups in Afghanistan

paxamericana:

Ethnolinguistic Groups in Afghanistan

Saturday, September 17, 2011

A language map from “A Historical Atlas of South Asia,” Oxford University Press (New York), 1992, courtesy of Himal Magazine

A language map from “A Historical Atlas of South Asia,” Oxford University Press (New York), 1992, courtesy of Himal Magazine

Sunday, September 4, 2011
makeanx:

Author extracted the major rivers and streams in Great Britain from the Ordnance Survey’s Strategi dataset and coloured them according to whether they are a “river”, “canal”, etc.  Found it followed settlement/ invasion patterns.
 

makeanx:

Author extracted the major rivers and streams in Great Britain from the Ordnance Survey’s Strategi dataset and coloured them according to whether they are a “river”, “canal”, etc.  Found it followed settlement/ invasion patterns.

 Settlement Pattern of the UK